Solar Flares and Twitter Follies

Solar Flare

So, it was an odd week. During an intense solar flare there were widespread reports of huge aurora borealis displays, often seen much farther south than usual. We might have been able to catch a glimpse of these but for one thing. We had a week of socked-in, cloud cover with intermittent rain and snow. No hope of seeing the sky.

I started physiotherapy for a neck problem seemingly caused by normal aging and arthritis — an impinged nerve that sends pain into my shoulder, down into my arm, and tingles all the way to my fingers. The exercises my therapist has given me are straight out of Treat Your Own Neck, by Robin McKenzie — a book he recommends highly.

A news item from this week is a head scratcher: British Tourists Arrested in American Terror Charges. In their Twitter comments the couple joked that they were going to “destroy America” (British slang meaning party hard), and “dig up Marilyn Monroe” (a quote from the comedy Family Guy which is an American show).

For his Twitter jokes, Leigh Van Bryan, 26, was handcuffed and kept under armed guard in a cell with Mexican drug dealers for 12 hours after landing in Los Angeles with pal Emily Bunting. Both had their luggage searched for spades and shovels.

Lessons learned? Big Brother is watching and BB has absolutely no sense of humour (even American-grown humour). The couple were barred from entering the U.S.

On a positive note, I just received an Amazon delivery: Garner’s Modern American Usage. I’ve already enjoyed spending over an hour opening the book at random and reading the passages. For anyone who loves the English language and enjoys usage and grammar discussions, this book is highly recommended.

2 thoughts on “Solar Flares and Twitter Follies

  1. I think we missed some northern lights and I’d have loved to see them. Such a shame.

    I’m curious to know if Garner’s “Modern English Usage” is a continuation of Fowlers?

  2. Jan, like you I regret not having the chance to see them. They’re a rarity this far south.

    Garner’s “Modern American Usage” is a different book altogether. Fowler’s has been updated and is still covering, largely, British usage. I had a typo in my piece and mistakenly labelled it “Modern English Usage.” Sorry.

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